Research Paper Volume 13, Issue 5 pp 6702—6711

The impact of visceral obesity on chronic constipation, inflammation, immune function and cognitive function in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

Impact of visceral obesity in different sex groups in patients with Crohn’s disease. (A) Impact of visceral obesity on IL-6. Male patients with visceral obesity had higher level of IL-6 compared with male patients without visceral obesity (17.18 ± 10.5 pg/ml, n=11 vs. 7.5 ± 3.02 pg/ml, n=6, P = 0.045). Female patients with visceral obesity tended to have higher level of IL-6 compared with female patients without visceral obesity (14.48 ± 10.66 pg/ml, n=26 vs. 9.83 ± 7.49 pg/ml, n=29, P = 0.065). (B) Impact of visceral obesity on CD4+ T cells. Male patients with visceral obesity had lower level of CD4+ T cells compared with male patients without visceral obesity (32.87 ± 3.03%, n=11 vs. 45.33 ± 2.88%, n=6, P + T cells compared with female patients without visceral obesity (32.63 ± 3.2%, n=26 vs. 43.72 ± 2.56%, n=29, P

Figure 4. Impact of visceral obesity in different sex groups in patients with Crohn’s disease. (A) Impact of visceral obesity on IL-6. Male patients with visceral obesity had higher level of IL-6 compared with male patients without visceral obesity (17.18 ± 10.5 pg/ml, n=11 vs. 7.5 ± 3.02 pg/ml, n=6, P = 0.045). Female patients with visceral obesity tended to have higher level of IL-6 compared with female patients without visceral obesity (14.48 ± 10.66 pg/ml, n=26 vs. 9.83 ± 7.49 pg/ml, n=29, P = 0.065). (B) Impact of visceral obesity on CD4+ T cells. Male patients with visceral obesity had lower level of CD4+ T cells compared with male patients without visceral obesity (32.87 ± 3.03%, n=11 vs. 45.33 ± 2.88%, n=6, P <0.001). Female patients with visceral obesity had lower level of CD4+ T cells compared with female patients without visceral obesity (32.63 ± 3.2%, n=26 vs. 43.72 ± 2.56%, n=29, P <0.001).