Research Paper Volume 11, Issue 22 pp 10454—10467

Abnormal gut microbiota composition contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in db/db mice

Figure 2. Differences in the composition of the gut microbiota at the phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species levels between db/db and m/m mice. (A) Phylum Verrucomicrobia (Mann–Whitney U test; P < 0.05); (B) Class Verrucomicrobiae (Mann–Whitney U test; P < 0.05); (C) Order Verrucomicrobiales (Mann–Whitney U test; P < 0.05); (D) Family Bacteroidaceae (t10 = 2.236, P < 0.05); (E) Family Prevotellaceae (t10 = 2.714, P < 0.05); (F) Family S24-7 (t10 = 2.796, P < 0.05); (G) Family Verrucomicrobiaceae (Mann–Whitney U test; P < 0.05); (H) Family Others (<0.5%) (Mann–Whitney U test; P < 0.05); (I) Genus Akkermansia (Mann–Whitney U test; P < 0.05); (J) Genus Bacteroides (t10 = 2.236, P < 0.05); (K) Genus Clostridium (t10 = 2.399, P < 0.05); (L) Genus Prevotella (Mann–Whitney U test; P < 0.01); (M) Genus Unclassified (t10 = 2.62, P < 0.05); (N) Species Akkermansia muciniphila (Mann–Whitney U test; P<0.05); (O) Species Bacteroides acidifaciens (Mann–Whitney U test; P = 0.087); (P) Species Lactobacillus reuteri (t10 = 2.708, P<0.05); (Q) Species Ruminococcus gnavus (t10 = 3.059, P<0.05). Data are shown as mean ± SEM values (n=6). *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001. NS, not significant; SEM, standard error of the mean.