Research Paper Volume 12, Issue 1 pp 844—865

Surgery/Anesthesia disturbs mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics in the brain of aged mice with postoperative delirium

Figure 2. Surgery/Anesthesia impaired the behavior of aged mice at 6, 9, and 24 hours postoperatively. (A) Surgery/Anesthesia increased the latency of mice to eat the food as compared to the control condition in the buried food test at 6 and 9 hours postoperatively. Surgery/Anesthesia did not significantly alter the latency of mice to eat food as compared to the control condition at 24 hours postoperatively. (B) Surgery/Anesthesia did not significantly change the total distance travelled by mice in the open field test as compared to the control condition at 6, 9, and 24 hours postoperatively. (C) Surgery/Anesthesia significantly decreased the time spent in the center of the open field as compared to the control condition at 6 but neither 9 nor 24 hours postoperatively. (D) Surgery/Anesthesia significantly decreased the freezing time in the open field test as compared to the control condition at 6 and 24 but not 9 hours postoperatively. (E) Surgery/Anesthesia did not significantly change the time to reach the center (latency to the center) in the open field test as compared to the control condition at 6, 9, and 24 hours postoperatively. (F) Surgery/Anesthesia did not significantly change the number of arm visits in the Y maze test as compared to the control condition at 6, 9, and 24 hours postoperatively. (G) Surgery/Anesthesia significantly decreased the number of entries in the novel arm in the Y maze test as compared to the control condition at 6 and 9 but not 24 hours postoperatively. (H) Surgery/Anesthesia significantly decreased the duration in the novel arm in the Y maze test as compared to the control condition at 6 and 24 but not 9 hours postoperatively. The data are plotted as the mean ± standard error of the mean for each group (n = 9). *p < 0.05 and **p < 0.01, compared to control.