Research Paper Volume 13, Issue 12 pp 16219—16228

Immunological discrepancy in aged mice facilitates skin allograft survival

A representative of cytotoxic tests. (A) When R1.1 cells (H-2k, allogeneic) were used as target cells, T-cells derived from aged mice had a lower Ag-specific cytotoxic ability than T-cells derived from young mice (21.2 ± 3.0% versus 39.3 ± 4.8% at target cell/effector cells = 1/100, p = 0.003). (B) When p815 cells (H-2d, third party) were used as target cells, T-cells derived from aged mice had a lower cytotoxic ability than T-cells derived from young mice (6.0 ± 0.6% versus 11.0 ± 2.7% at target cell/effector cells = 1/100, p = 0.017). (C) When Yac-1 cells (non-Ag-specific, nature killer-sensitive) were used as target cells, the cytotoxic ability of T-cells derived from aged or young mice were not different (28.6 ± 0.6% versus 32.8 ± 3.5% at target cell/effector cells = 1/100, p = 0.100).

Figure 3. A representative of cytotoxic tests. (A) When R1.1 cells (H-2k, allogeneic) were used as target cells, T-cells derived from aged mice had a lower Ag-specific cytotoxic ability than T-cells derived from young mice (21.2 ± 3.0% versus 39.3 ± 4.8% at target cell/effector cells = 1/100, p = 0.003). (B) When p815 cells (H-2d, third party) were used as target cells, T-cells derived from aged mice had a lower cytotoxic ability than T-cells derived from young mice (6.0 ± 0.6% versus 11.0 ± 2.7% at target cell/effector cells = 1/100, p = 0.017). (C) When Yac-1 cells (non-Ag-specific, nature killer-sensitive) were used as target cells, the cytotoxic ability of T-cells derived from aged or young mice were not different (28.6 ± 0.6% versus 32.8 ± 3.5% at target cell/effector cells = 1/100, p = 0.100).