Research Paper Volume 10, Issue 10 pp 2624—2635

A joint analysis of metabolomic profiles associated with muscle mass and strength in Caucasian women

Qi Zhao 1, *, , Hui Shen 2, *, , Kuan-Jui Su 2, , Qing Tian 2, , Lan-Juan Zhao 2, , Chuan Qiu 2, , Timothy J. Garrett 3, , Jiawang Liu 4, 5, , David Kakhniashvili 6, , Hong-Wen Deng 2, 7, ,

  • 1 Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA
  • 2 Tulane Center of Bioinformatics and Genomics, Department of Global Biostatistics and Data Science, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
  • 3 Southeast Center for Integrated Metabolomics Core, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
  • 4 Medicinal Chemistry Core, Office of Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA
  • 5 Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA
  • 6 Proteomics and Metabolomics Core, Office of Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA
  • 7 School of Basic Medical Science, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410013, China
* Equal contribution

received: July 17, 2018 ; accepted: September 24, 2018 ; published: October 14, 2018 ;

https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.101574
How to Cite

Copyright: Zhao et al. This is an open‐access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Both loss of muscle mass and strength are important sarcopenia-related traits. In this study, we investigated both specific and shared serum metabolites associated with these two traits in 136 Caucasian women using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. A joint analysis of multivariate traits was used to examine the associations of individual metabolites with muscle mass measured by the body mass index-adjusted appendicular lean mass (ALM/BMI) and muscle strength measured by hand grip strength (HGS). After adjusting for multiple testing, nine metabolites including two amino acids (aspartic acid and glutamic acid) and an amino acid derive (pipecolic acid), one peptide (phenylalanyl-threonine), one carbohydrate (methyl beta-D-glucopyranoside), and four lipids (12S-HETRE, arachidonic acid, 12S-HETE, and glycerophosphocholine) were significant in the joint analysis. Of them, the two amino acids (aspartic acid and glutamic acid) and two lipids (12S-HETRE and 12S-HETE) were associated with both ALM/BMI and HGS, and the other five were only associated with ALM/BMI. The pathway analysis showed the amino acid metabolism pathways (aspartic acid and glutamic acid) might play important roles in the regulation of muscle mass and strength. In conclusion, our study identified novel metabolites associated with sarcopenia-related traits, suggesting novel metabolic pathways for muscle regulation.

Abbreviations

ALM/BMI: appendicular lean mass/body mass index; DXA: dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; FDR: false discovery rate; HGS: hand grip strength; LC-MS: liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry; LOS: Louisiana Osteoporosis Study; SD: standard deviation; 12(S)-HETE: 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid; 12(S)-HETRE: (12S)-hydroxy-(8Z,10E,14Z)-eicosatrienoic acid.