Press Release

Small extracellular vesicles and their miRNA cargo are anti-apoptotic members of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype

06-01-2018

The specific molecular mechanism of selective release and retention of senescence-associated sEV-mi RNAs and the EV-SASP cross talk between different cell types and its consequences in the context of aging and age-associated diseases, however, remains to be elucidated.

Dr. Johannes Grillari said "We confirm that EVs and their miRNA cargo are indeed part of the SASP (EV-SASP) and identified a set of selectively retained and secreted miRNAs after the onset of senescence. In addition, senescent cell derived EVs might contribute to an anti-apoptotic environment in tissues where senescent cells have accumulated."

Accumulation of senescent cells with age and at sites of age-associated diseases has been observed in the context of cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disease, skin conditions and others.

Mi RNAs clearly modulate cellular senescence and organismal aging in vitro and vivo and are in addition packaged into EVs, where they are able to influence osteogenic differentiation as one major age-associated disease.

Here, the research team confirmed that EVs and their mi RNA cargo are indeed part of the SASP and identified a set of selectively retained and secreted mi RNAs after the onset of senescence.

In addition, senescent cell derived EVs might contribute to an anti-apoptotic environment in tissues where senescent cells have accumulated.

The Grillari research team concluded "We suggest sEVs and their miRNA cargo to be novel, members of the SASP that are selectively secreted or retained in cellular senescence."

Full text – http://www.aging-us.com/article/101452/text

Correspondence to - Johannes Grillari - johannes.grillari@boku.ac.at

About Aging-US

Launched in 2009, Aging-US publishes papers of general interest and biological significance in all fields of aging research as well as topics beyond traditional gerontology, including, but not limited to, cellular and molecular biology, human age-related diseases, pathology in model organisms, cancer, signal transduction pathways (e.g., p53, sirtuins, and PI-3K/AKT/mTOR among others), and approaches to modulating these signaling pathways.

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