Press Release

Aging-US: COVID-19 and chronological aging: anti-aging drugs for treatment or prevention

04-20-2020

Volume 12, Issue 8 of @AgingJrnl reported that similarly, two proposed therapeutics for the treatment of COVID-19 infection are Azithromycin and Quercetin, both drugs with significant senolytic activity.

Therefore, the authors wish to speculate that the fight against COVID-19 disease should involve testing the hypothesis that senolytics and other anti-aging drugs may have a prominent role in preventing the transmission of the virus, as well as aid in its treatment.

Thus, they propose that new clinical trials may be warranted, as several senolytic and anti-aging therapeutics are existing FDA-approved drugs, with excellent safety profiles, and would be readily available for drug repurposing efforts.

Dr. Michael P. Lisanti and Dr. Federica Sotgia from The Department of Translational Medicine, School of Science, Engineering and Environment (SEE) at The University of Salford in Greater Manchester United Kingdom said, "The earliest retrospective study of the COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan, China, published in the Lancet, was among one of the first clinical studies to identify older age as a significant risk factor for in-hospital mortality, suggesting that advanced chronological age may play an epidemiological role in patient clinical outcomes."

"The earliest retrospective study of the COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan, China, published in the Lancet, was among one of the first clinical studies to identify older age as a significant risk factor for in-hospital mortality, suggesting that advanced chronological age may play an epidemiological role in patient clinical outcomes"

- Dr. Michael P. Lisanti and Dr. Federica Sotgia, The Department of Translational Medicine, School of Science, Engineering and Environment (SEE) at The University of Salford

This specific association of COVID-19 fatality with advanced chronological age was directly validated by the CDC in the US population and published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report on the 18th of March, as follows: "This first preliminary description of outcomes among patients with COVID-19 in the United States indicates that fatality was highest in persons aged 85, ranging from 10% to 27%, followed by 3% to 11% among persons aged 65 84 years, 1% to 3% among persons aged 55-64 years."

Figure 1. What is the relationship between COVID-19 and advanced chronological age? Here, we suggest that the COVID-19 corona virus preferentially targets senescent lung cells, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality in the aging population. One possible solution for prevention/treatment would be the use of senolytics or other anti-aging drugs. Testing this hypothesis will require the necessary clinical trials, with a focus on drug repurposing.

The Lisanti/Sotgia Research Team concluded in their Aging-US Research Perspective Article that in contrast, in older mice, productive infection with SARS-Co V led to a more severe interstitial pneumonitis, with alveolar damage, significant fibrosis, and scarring, as well as severe activation of cytokine production, including TNF-, IL-6, CCL-2, CCL-3, CXCL-10, and IFN-.

Full Text - https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.103001

Correspondence to: Federica Sotgia email: fsotgia@gmail.com and Michael P. Lisanti email: michaelp.lisanti@gmail.com

Keywords: COVID-19, corona virus, aging, senolytic drug therapy, prevention, viral replication, drug repurposing, antibiotic, Azithromycin, Hydroxy-chloroquine, Rapamycin, Doxycycline, Quercetin,

Interview with Dr. Michael P. Lisanti from The University of Salford



About Aging-US

Launched in 2009, Aging-US publishes papers of general interest and biological significance in all fields of aging research as well as topics beyond traditional gerontology, including, but not limited to, cellular and molecular biology, human age-related diseases, pathology in model organisms, cancer, signal transduction pathways (e.g., p53, sirtuins, and PI-3K/AKT/mTOR among others), and approaches to modulating these signaling pathways.

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