Press Release

Aging-US: Psychological aging, depression, and well-being

11-10-2020

Aging-US recently published "Psychological aging, depression, and well-being" which reported that Aging is a multifactorial process, which affects the human body on every level and results in both biological and psychological changes.

These factors can be used for a future development of individual psychological aging clocks, which may be utilized as a sensitive measure for health status and overall life satisfaction.

Furthermore, recent progress in artificial intelligence and biomarkers of biological aging have enabled scientists to discover and evaluate the efficacy of potential aging- and disease-modifying drugs and interventions.

They propose that biomarkers of psychological age, which are just as important as those for biological age, may likewise be used for these purposes.

The Aging-US authors foresee the development of a broad range of parametric and deep psychological and biopsychological aging clocks, which may have implications for drug development and therapeutic interventions, and thus healthcare and other industries.

"The Aging-US authors foresee the development of a broad range of parametric and deep psychological and biopsychological aging clocks, which may have implications for drug development and therapeutic interventions, and thus healthcare and other industries"

Dr. Alex Zhavoronkov from Deep Longevity, Inc., The Longevity Vision Fund, and Insilico Medicine said, "Like many other species, humans have a shorter lifespan in the absence of medical interventions."

This theory and associated studies have highlighted the importance of the psychology of aging as a field and laid the foundation for studies of psychological and psychophysiological aging markers.

While substantial progress has been made in identifying biomarkers of human biological aging, psychological aging is still poorly understood.

In this paper the authors reflect upon the recent progress in the development of biomarkers of biological aging. They further provide a brief overview of the psychology of aging. They propose that this body of knowledge will lay the foundations for the development of next-generation biomarkers of psychological aging, dubbed psychological aging clocks, as well as deep multi-modal biopsychological and psychophysiological biomarkers of aging.

Figure 4. Funding by years related to the topic of “Psychological Aging”. Source: https://www.pharmacognitive.com/

These include blood biochemistry-based clocks, transcriptomic and proteomic aging clocks, epigenetic aging clocks, microbiome aging clocks, photographic aging clocks, and many others.

Unlike the biological features used in biological aging clocks, many modifiable psychological aging features are easily interpretable by individuals and scientific specialists.

The Zhavoronkov Research Team concluded in their Aging-US research paper that this theory and associated studies have highlighted the importance of the psychology of aging as a field and laid the foundation for studies of psychological and psychophysiological aging markers.

Full Text - https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.103880

Correspondence to: Alex Zhavoronkov email: alex@insilico.com

Keywords: psychological age, subjective age, biological age, depression, well-being

About Aging-US

Launched in 2009, Aging-US publishes papers of general interest and biological significance in all fields of aging research as well as topics beyond traditional gerontology, including, but not limited to, cellular and molecular biology, human age-related diseases, pathology in model organisms, cancer, signal transduction pathways (e.g., p53, sirtuins, and PI-3K/AKT/mTOR among others), and approaches to modulating these signaling pathways.

To learn more about Aging-US, please visit http://www.Aging-US.com or connect with @AgingJrnl

Aging-US is published by Impact Journals, LLC please visit http://www.ImpactJournals.com or connect with @ImpactJrnls

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